June’s Pest of the Month| Earwigs

 Earwigs, “Pincher Bug”

2901162091_e76c3ba782_zCommon Name: Earwig – European Earwig
Latin Name: Forficula auricularia
Common Family Name: Earwigs
Latin Family Name: DermapteraOther Names: Pincher bugsOrigin: Probably from Europe or Asia, but this species is now found throughout the world. It was first found in the U.S. around 1907 near Seattle, Washington.

Biology: One of about 7 species of pest earwigs in the U.S., the European Earwig is the most common. It has a simple life cycle, requiring 3 to 5 months to go from egg to adult, depending on temperatures. Adults generally live only about one year. Adults are capable of some flight. Earwigs feed primarily on plant material, but also are predators on many other insects.

Identification: Earwigs are most easily identified by the strong “pincers” at the hind end, as modifications of their cerci. These are used for defense, food capture, and some other uses. Wings on adults consist of the hind pair used for flight, and a very short front pair used as a cover for the folded hind wings. The European Earwig is distinguished from other U.S. species by having the second tarsal segment elongated under the first segment.earwig-mothers-parental-care_25412

Characteristics Important in Control: Reduction of exterior harborage sites is vital, such as lumber or firewood piles, yard debris, or other unnecessary piled materials on the soil. Control of moisture also reduces the favorable habitats for earwigs. Granular insect baits are accepted in exterior locations, and pyrethroid insecticide applications will intercept wandering earwigs along pathways and around foundations.

Source: http://pestweb.com/pests

Bed Bugs Dos & Don’ts

Pest Control, Bed Bug

Pest Control, Bed Bug

When it comes to bed bugs, there are many myths and theories out there, but here are some helpful tips of what to do and more importantly what not to do in the case of bed bugs..

 

Do:
• Get a bed bug inspection as soon as you suspect a problem!

• Save any bugs you find. Several bugs are commonly mistaken for bed bugs including young cockroaches, ticks and carpet beetles.

• Contact your landlord or property manager if you live in an apartment building and advise them of the problem.

• Use caution when buying or acquiring used furniture, TVs, electronics, clothing, boxes, etc. These items may be infested with bed bugs. If you must take them, inspect items for signs of infestation carefully. Wash or heat treat clothing, bedding, etc. before storing them with your personal belongings.

• Eliminate clutter, especially in the bedrooms. Piles of laundry, newspapers, magazines, junk, etc. Seal discarded items in plastic bags before removing them from the infested area and dispose of them immediately in the outdoor trash.

• Tightly seal any items that you are moving out of the infested area in plastic garbage bags. Before you take anything out of the infested area (to the trash or to be laundered or otherwise treated), make sure it is tightly sealed in plastic to avoid dropping bed bugs and eggs and spreading the infestation.

• Wash, dry and store clothing, bedding, linens and other items and keep them out of the infested area until all treatments are completed.

Don’t:
• Don’t throw away your bed, furniture clothes and other personal belongings unless instructed to by your pest control professional. These items can often be treated, saving you a great deal of money.

• Don’t move because of bed bugs. If your home is infested, so are your belongings, you will just carry the problem to a new location.

• Don’t pick up beds, furniture or other items put out for trash collection. These items may have been discarded because of a bed bug infestation.

• Don’t attempt to treat bed bugs on your own. The National Pest Management Agency (NPMA) states, “This is not a pest that can be controlled with do-it-yourself measures.” The NPMA also declared the bed bug the most difficult indoor pest to control, even for professional pest managers.

• Don’t use outdoor pesticides indoors to try to treat bedbugs. These pesticides can cause serious health problems and even death when not used in accordance with their labels.

• Do not use rubbing alcohol, lawn and garden chemicals and other flammable materials to treat bed bugs. These products are being implicated in house fires around the country.

• Do not use foggers or bug bombs to treat bed bugs. They don’t work and they chase bed bugs into other areas of the structure, making treatment more difficult and expensive.

 

Most importantly, if you’re having an issue with bed bugs, call us for a free estimate today!