Pest of the year!

2016 Pest of the Year!

Pest Control, Bed Bug

When it comes to bed bugs, there are many myths and theories out there, but here are some helpful tips of what to do and more importantly what not to do in the case of bed bugs..

 

Do:
• Get a bed bug inspection as soon as you suspect a problem!

• Save any bugs you find. Several bugs are commonly mistaken for bed bugs including young cockroaches, ticks and carpet beetles.

• Contact your landlord or property manager if you live in an apartment building and advise them of the problem.

• Use caution when buying or acquiring used furniture, TVs, electronics, clothing, boxes, etc. These items may be infested with bed bugs. If you must take them, inspect items for signs of infestation carefully. Wash or heat treat clothing, bedding, etc. before storing them with your personal belongings.

• Eliminate clutter, especially in the bedrooms. Piles of laundry, newspapers, magazines, junk, etc. Seal discarded items in plastic bags before removing them from the infested area and dispose of them immediately in the outdoor trash.

• Tightly seal any items that you are moving out of the infested area in plastic garbage bags. Before you take anything out of the infested area (to the trash or to be laundered or otherwise treated), make sure it is tightly sealed in plastic to avoid dropping bed bugs and eggs and spreading the infestation.

• Wash, dry and store clothing, bedding, linens and other items and keep them out of the infested area until all treatments are completed.begbugmattressexample

Don’t:
• Don’t throw away your bed, furniture clothes and other personal belongings unless instructed to by your pest control professional. These items can often be treated, saving you a great deal of money.

• Don’t move because of bed bugs. If your home is infested, so are your belongings, you will just carry the problem to a new location.

• Don’t pick up beds, furniture or other items put out for trash collection. These items may have been discarded because of a bed bug infestation.

• Don’t attempt to treat bed bugs on your own. The National Pest Management Agency (NPMA) states, “This is not a pest that can be controlled with do-it-yourself measures.” The NPMA also declared the bed bug the most difficult indoor pest to control, even for professional pest managers.

• Don’t use outdoor pesticides indoors to try to treat bedbugs. These pesticides can cause serious health problems and even death when not used in accordance with their labels.

• Do not use rubbing alcohol, lawn and garden chemicals and other flammable materials to treat bed bugs. These products are being implicated in house fires around the country.

• Do not use foggers or bug bombs to treat bed bugs. They don’t work and they chase bed bugs into other areas of the structure, making treatment more difficult and expensive.

 

Most importantly, if you’re having an issue with bed bugs, call us for a free estimate today!

March Pest of the Month

The Clover Mite

RedThis month’s pest is the clover mite. These mites will start to show up as the weather gets a little warmer and the plant life gets a little greener. Our pest control service can take care of these little guys and any other pests that start popping up as the snow melts and the sun starts to shine!  

Scale of a clover mite

Scale of a clover mite

 

Common Name: Mite – Clover mite
Latin Name: Bryobia praetiosa
Common Family Name: Prostigmatic mites
Latin Family Name: Tetranychidae

Origin: This pest is a native species of mite in North America.

Biology: The mites in this family are primarily plant parasites, and many of them are serious pests of crops and ornamentals. The clover mite feeds on many kinds of trees, shrubs, bedding plants and turf, but does not bite humans. It becomes a problem when it invades structures in large numbers, especially during warm periods of the year. When crushed they leave small red stains on the surface. No male clover mites have been found, with females reproducing by parthenogenesis. Reproduction is rapid, with hundreds of thousands of mites being produced in a very short time. Eggs are laid in cracks on almost any surface, including trees and the outside of buildings. All stages of the mites may overwinter, although the egg stage is the most common.

mite

Identification: The clover mites are easily distinguished from other mites by the relatively large size – 1 mm – very round, red body, and extremely long front legs that are held directly out to the front.

Characteristics Important in Control: Inside invasions can be controlled by vacuuming or applications of a residual pyrethroid insecticide. However, due to the staining potential of these mites indoors it is better to prevent entry. Reduction of their populations outside can be done with applications of a labeled product on the infested foliage, as well as with perimeter applications around the exterior of a building to intercept migrating mites. Maintaining a strip of bare ground, without vegetation, around the perimeter of a building also helps to discourage their presence near the structure.

 

Reference: https://pestid.univares.com

July Pest of the Month | Roaches

 Cockroach – American cockroach

Common Name: Cockroach – American cockroachcockroach-01
Latin Name: Periplaneta americana
Common Family Name: Blattid cockroaches
Latin Family Name: Blattidae

Origin: Possibly from northern Africa or Asia, but found worldwide for many centuries now. It occurs throughout the United States as a common indoor and outdoor cockroach, and in some areas may be more common than the German roach.

Biology: This species is common outdoors in landscape plantings, in sewers or storm drain systems, and in lower areas of buildings where moisture may be greater. It may inhabit storm drains in huge numbers, emerging though man-hole covers at night to invade buildings. They will feed on most carbohydrate or protein based materials, including human hair or finger and toenails. Each female produces around 10 egg capsules, carrying the capsule for a day or two and then carefully placing it in a protected location. Each egg capsule has an average of 15 eggs in it and these hatch in about 45 days. Development to the adult stage averages about 450 days, but may take well over 2 years in colder climates. Adults live an average of around 1 year, but potentially can live almost 3 years.

Roach2Identification: The American roach adult has fully developed wings and is capable of some flight, usually from an upper location to a lower surface. It is reddish brown with a yellow ring around the prothorax. Adults may be up to 1.5 inches long from head to tail, with extremely long antennae. The cerci are long and thin, a character that separates the nymphs of American roaches from those of Oriental roaches.

 

 

Characteristics Important in Control: Since this species is abundant outdoors, control begins withcockroach-american habit management in the outdoor areas. Removal of harborage sites under debris or piles of wood and discarded materials will reduce populations near a structure. Control of food and moisture sources outdoors and indoors are important. Granular insect baits are well accepted, and the use of a perimeter treatment with a residual insecticide will intercept many individuals that attempt to access a structure

 

Source: pestweb.com

Bed Bug Questions, Answered

 

It’s bed bug awareness week | And if you’ve got questions? We’ve got answers!

 

Q: What are some of the most common places to get bed bugs??
A: Well bed bugs can come from anywhere. But some of the most common places they are found are (but not limited to):
  1. Hotels
  2. Public Transportation
  3. Movie Theaters
  4. Retail Stores
  5. Medical Facilities
  6. Home
  7. Friends’ Home
  8. Work Place
Q: Are bed bugs more attracted to dirty homes?
A: No. This is a common and incorrect stigma. Sanitary conditions DO NOT affect the ability to get bed bugs or add any kind of attractive factor when it comes to them. Anyone can get them, regardless of sanitation.
Q: Years ago I rarely ever heard about bed bugs, why does it seem like they’re everywhere now?
A: There are a lot of factors that play a role in bed bug population, but a lot of it has to do with the increase of travel. Years ago people weren’t as likely to just hop on a plane and head overseas for vacation or across the country hitting up a hotel after hotel. Also there has been a significant increase in college education. Now more teenagers pack up their stuff and head into dorm rooms and study abroad programs all over the world.
To add to the interaction between people and places, the bed bugs themselves have become adaptive to many pest control products. The University of Kentucky released a study on bed bugs proving that their genes have developed a resistance to pesticides alone…
The Scientific American reported, “The high number of resistance genes in all populations examined by Palli and his colleagues is ‘horrifying,’ says Rajeev Vaidyanathan, an associate director of vector biology in the Center for Immunology and Infectious Disease at SRI International, who was not involved in the study. That the bugs have multiple ways of undermining the effects of pesticides is ‘devastating,’ he adds.
Q: I did my research and the internet has a lot of “do it yourself” ways to get rid of bed bugs, do any of them work?
A: This is not a pin it on Pinterest kind of ordeal… if you have bed bugs, you have a serious problem. The longer you wait, the worse the infestation is going to get. We’ve heard it all…dryer sheets, rubbing alcohol, garlic, kerosene heaters, over the counter sprays, and even complete clean outs. The truth is, the only proven and effective way to remove bed bugs is by a professional who offers heat treatment. There are certain steps you  could do to help your situation: wash clothing and linens in hot water and dry on high in your dryer, use a steam cleaner or hairdryer for shoes and other non-washable items to stop from spreading the eggs, and stay out/off infested areas within your home. Bed bugs, like stated before, are resistant to certain professional products, but heating a facility with the proper equipment and at the right temperature is the most proven method to remove and rid your home of these pests. This is not a DIY project; this is a call a professional matter.
Q: My couch has bed bugs, should I just throw it out? Will it get rid of my problem?
A: No. We realize that everyone’s first instinct would be to remove the item that is infested. It seems simple: remove the couch and then the bed bugs go with it. However, doing that has the opposite effect. When you take that couch or mattress through your home to throw it out, those bed bugs go everywhere but ‘out’. By doing that you are now spreading them and their eggs throughout your home. They could now be on the carpeting, the walls, the stairs, the legs of your pants and the bottoms of your shoes. Keep the item in your home, heat treatments now allow us to kill the bed bugs without removing all your belongings.
Q: My husband has bites but I don’t. How are these marks from bed bugs when we both sleep in the same bed?
A: This is a common occurrence and is often a misdiagnosis when it comes to bed bugs. In these situations the bit marks are actually misconstrued for a rash. The truth is that two people can sleep in a bed with bedbugs and only one will be visually bitten. Those who are visually bitten are actually having an allergic reaction to the anesthetic injected by the bed bug. You see, when bed bugs bite, they inject an anesthetic and an anticoagulant (blood clotting deterrent) that prevents a person from realizing they are being bitten. Most people do not realize they have been bitten until bite marks appear anywhere from one to several days after the initial bite. Some people never develop any sign of being bitten at all.
Q:I have pets, can they get bit?
A: Bed bugs prefer to bite people and will not seek out animals unless a human host cannot be found. Pet bedding and fur can carry bed bugs, but they will travel to humans to actually feed.
Q: Can bed bugs carry diseases?
A:Bed bugs should not be considered as a medical or public health hazard. Bed bugs are not known to spread disease. Bed bugs can be an annoyance because their presence may cause itching and loss of sleep along with allergic reactions.

 

Remember, Seitz Brothers always offers free estimates and provides the most advanced heat treatment to eliminate bed bugs. If you think you’re having an issue with bed bugs, call us today for information or to set up an estimate. If you have any other questions regarding bed bugs, please don’t hesitate to call your local office, we’d be happy help!

Do You Have Termites??

How-to-Get-Rid-Of-Termites

           Spring is here and so are the termites. We’ve had a couple swarms in the last couple of weeks, so it’s time to be on the lookout. A termite infestation can be causing thousands of dollars of damage in your home without you even knowing it. Not only that, but the structural stability could be at risk. It’s important for homeowners to know some of the signs of an infestation. Here is what to look for:

 

  1. Mud TubesPicture-033

These tubes are mostly found near the foundation of the home. They are built for traveling and provide the termites with moisture as they go from the colony and food.

 

 

8c3892e9-d9da-4da2-a05e-279755f810c7

 

  1. Wood Damage

We all know that termites eat wood and they do so from the inside out. Signs of wood damage from termites are hollow sounding, soft, and blistering pieces wood

 

 

 

  1. Swarmers and WingsTermite-Swarmers

These are winged termites that begin swarming after the last freeze of the winter. Check for these swarms and their discarded wings near doors and windowsills.

 

 

  1. Frassc8a8f771-1ce0-4e46-954a-84cdede0a916

Termites produce light, wood-colored droppings as they eat through wood.

 

 

 

 

  1. Bubbling Paint6a01630411e30a970d01630411eb1e970d

If you have cracked paint it is caused by the buildup of moisture. This either means an issue with water damage or termites.

 

 

 

If you have any of these signs, call us for more information or an estimate!

Let’s Get Real About Rodents

17lmkyj2gut49jpgWe keep talking about the warmer weather and the potential pests that are coming our way. But in these transition months between the dead of winter and the dog days of summer, we have some present pests that are still dying to get into our homes even though we are itching to get out. Rodents are attracted to structures for warmth and food during the colder months and continue to be a problem long after.

 

It’s true that nobody wants to share their home with a rodent or worse, a family of rodents (who after 30 days of age can reproduce a litter of 5-6 young) but what a lot of people aren’t aware of are the health hazards these pests pose. When it comes to rodents, there are more than 35 diseases they are known to spread. The spread of these diseases can reach humans directly from contact with rodent urine, saliva and feces, through bites, and  through handling them alive or dead. Indirectly, they can be spread through mites, fleas, and ticks that have fed on an infected rodent. Allergies and  airborne illnesses like salmonella can be caused by droppings alone. To put it in perspective: one rodent can excrete up to seventy times a day…

I know, not something any of us want to think about. But the truth is, 21 million homes are invaded every year by these vermin and their welcome sign can be as small as a nickel.

Have a rodent issue and this it’s not a big deal? Think again…

Some of the most common and dangerous diseases rodents carry include tularemia, plague, hantavirus, and lymphocytic choriomenigitis.

TULAREMIAHealth-Symbol-1024x1015

Tularemia is a disease of animals and humans caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. Rabbits, hares, and other rodents are especially susceptible and often die in large numbers during outbreaks. Humans can become infected through several routes, including tick and deer fly bites; skin contact with infected animals; ingestion of contaminated water; and through laboratory exposure or inhalation of contaminated dusts or aerosols.

The signs and symptoms of tularemia vary depending on how the bacteria enters the body. All forms are accompanied by fever, which can be as high as 104 °F. Although tularemia can be life-threatening, most infections can be treated successfully with antibiotics.

The most serious form of tularemia is oneumonic infection. Symptoms include cough, chest pain, and difficulty breathing. This form results from breathing dusts or aerosols containing the organism. It can also occur when other forms of tularemia (e.g. ulceroglandular) are left untreated and the bacteria spread through the bloodstream to the lungs.

PLAGUE

Plague is infamous for killing millions of people in Europe during the Middle Ages. It is a disease that affects humans and other mammals and is caused by the bacterium, Yersinia pestis. Humans usually get plague after being bitten by an infected rodent flea or by handling an animal infected with plague.

Plague bacteria are most often transmitted by the bite of an infected flea. If an infected rodent dies, hungry fleas will seek other sources of blood – including humans., although dogs and cats may also bring plague-infected fleas into the home. Flea bite exposure typically results in bubonic plague.

Pneumonic plague typically develops after a person breathes inbacteria-containing droplets. Patients develop fever, headache, weakness, and a rapidly developing pneumonia with shortness of breath, chest pain, and cough. The pneumonia may cause respiratory failure and shock. Pneumonic plague is the most serious form of the disease and is the only form of plague that can be spread from person to person

Plague is a very serious illness, but is treatable with commonly available antibiotics. However, without prompt treatment, the disease can cause serious illness or death. The earlier a patient seeks medical care and receives treatment that is appropriate for plague, the better his or her chances are for a full recovery. Close contacts of patients with pneumonic plague may need to be evaluated and possibly treated as well.

HANTAVIRUS

People become infected with Hantavirus through several routes, but rodent infestation in and around the home remains the primary risk. The virus is mainly transmitted to people when fresh rodent urine, droppings, or nesting materials are stirred up, become airborne and are breathed in by people. In addition, if an infected rodent bites someone, the virus may be spread to that person. Researchers also suspect people can become sick if they eat food contaminated by urine, droppings, or saliva from an infected rodent.

Typically, symptoms of Hantavirus develop between one and five weeks after exposure to fresh urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents. Infection with Hantavirus can progress to Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS), a severe respiratory disease which can be fatal. Early symptoms include fatigue, fever and muscle aches in the thighs, hips, back, and sometimes shoulders. The infected person may also experience headaches, dizziness, chills, and abdominal complaints, such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Four to ten days after the initial phase of illness, the late symptoms of Hantavirus infection develop and HPS may appear. These include coughing and shortness of breath and progression to respiratory distress and failure. HPS has a mortality rate of 38 percent.

LYMPHOCYTIC CHORIOMENINGITIS (LCM)

Lymphocytic choriomeningitis, or LCM, is a rodent-borne viral infectious disease caused by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The primary host of LCMV is the common house mouse. It is estimated that 5 percent of house mice throughout the United States carry LCMV and are able to transmit the virus.

Transmission of LCMV infections can occur after exposure to fresh urine, droppings, saliva, or nesting materials from infected rodents. Infections are more common in the colder months when mice enter homes seeking warmer winter habitats. Transmission may also occur when these materials are directly introduced into broken skin, the nose, the eyes, or the mouth – or  presumably, via the bite of an infected rodent. Person-to-person transmission has not been reported, with the exception of vertical transmission from infected mother to fetus, and rarely, through organ transplantation.

Most patients who develop neurological disease due to LCMV survive. However, as in all infections of the central nervous system, particularly encephalitis, temporary or permanent neurological damage is possible.

Women who become infected with LCM during pregnancy may pass the infection on to the fetus. Infections occurring during the first trimester may result in fetal death and pregnancy termination. Infections in the second and third trimesters may result in serious and permanent birth defects, including vision problems, mental retardation, and hydrocephaly (water on the brain).

SeitzBuilding copyThe good news? Pest management professionals, like Seitz Brothers, are qualified to treat and remove rodents and their diseases your home. If you’re having an issue, don’t wait for the problem to get worse, call us today for a free estimate 888-467-1008.

 

Reference: pestworld.org

Bon Voyage! …Without Bed Bugs

4.-SERAMBI-ROOM-INTERIOR1
Paradise or a Nightmare?? For many, spring break is here and the travel plans have been set. As you’re packing the sunblock and swimsuits the one thing you’re not thinking about is what may be in your luggage when you get back…bed bugs. The more traveling you do, the more likely you are to come in contact with them and the more likely you are to bring them all the way home. They can be anywhere, especially in your hotel room and especially on your trip back.

 

The truth is, bed bugs are no longer an uncommon pest that we hear about from time to time. They can be found just about anywhere and although not a seasonal pest, prime bed bug time appears to be during the summer months with nearly half (49 percent) of respondents saying infestations occur most often then and least often in the winter.

In a recent survey by the NPMA, 75% of pest control professionals indicated that they have encountered infestations of bed bugs in hotels and motels. So when traveling this spring break and this summer, follow these safe tips to make sure you’re just bringing back a sunburn and souvenirs!

 

hotelroom1

PLACES TO INSPECT

Prevent Bed Bugs When You Travel:

  • Thoroughly inspect the entire room before unpacking, including behind the headboard and in sofas/chairs.  If any pests are spotted, change rooms/establishments immediately.
  • Before you inspect your room, keep your luggage off the floor and consider either using the bathtub or the luggage rack
  • Bed bugs 8-12-13

    Bed Bug Excrement

    If you do need to change rooms, be sure that you do not move to a room adjacent and/or directly above/below the suspected infestation.  Bed bugs can easily hitchhike via housekeeping carts, luggage and even through wall sockets. If an infestation is spreading, it typically does so in the rooms closest to the origin.

  • Consider placing your suitcase in a plastic trash bag or protective cover during the duration of your trip to ensure that bed bugs cannot take up residence there prior to departure.
  • Remember: bed bugs travel by hitching rides. After your trip, inspect your suitcases before bringing them into the house. Vacuum your suitcase thoroughly before storing away. Consider using a garment hand steamer to steam your luggage, which will kill any bed bugs or eggs that may have hitched a ride home.
  • Wash all of your clothes – even those that have not been worn – in hot water to ensure that any bed bugs that may have made it that far are not placed into your drawers/closet.florida-bed-bugs-chart

 

Seitz Brothers offers over-the-counter luggage spray to help deter the spreading of bed bugs, call our office for more information or stop in today to pick some up! If you are concerned that you have an infestation after traveling, we also offer free estimates and would be more than happy to help    888-467-1008

 

 

References: www.pestworld.org, www.uky.edu

Most Common Occasional Pest Invaders

Most occasional invaders enter structures because outside weather conditions become too hostile for their survival. Learn more some of the pests that fall into this unique category.

stinkbug

1.The Stink Bug

Brown marmorated stink bugs are named for the odor they emit as a defense against predators. Adult stink bugs enter homes in the late fall to seek shelter from the winter weather. Similar to boxelder bugs, they often congregate en masse on the sides of buildings.

 

earwig2.The Earwig

Earwigs get their name from the myth that they crawl into people’s ears when they are sleeping. Earwigs tend to gather in large numbers outdoors, where they are often found under piles of lawn debris, mulch or in tree holes. They can occasionally enter homes through small cracks or rips in window screens.

 

3.The Silverfishsilverfish

Silverfish hide during the day, often in tight cracks or crevices. They are known to infest paper products, such as wallpaper, book bindings and envelopes. They also eat linen, rayon and cotton fabrics.

 

pillbug4.The Pillbug

Pillbugs are often called “rollie-pollies” because they roll into a ball when disturbed. Similar to other occasional invaders, pillbugs live in moist locations and are usually found under damp objects outdoors such as trash, rocks, or decaying vegetation, where they remain hidden during the day to reduce water loss.

 

5.The Centipedecentipede

Centipedes are sometimes called “hundred-leggers” because of their many pairs of legs. They are typically found in areas of high moisture, such as bathrooms and basements. If handled roughly, some larger species can inflict a painful bite. However, most centipedes don’t pose health or property threats.

 

House Cricket6.The House Cricket

House crickets are known for their loud chirping which is caused by rubbing their front wings together to attract females. During warm weather, house crickets typically live outdoors and are especially fond of garbage dumps. They are also attracted to electric lights in larger numbers.

 

7. The Ladybugladybug

Ladybugs are also known as lady beetles or ladybird beetles. Most species of this beetle family are highly beneficial insects, but some enter homes in the autumn and can become a nuisance. Most ladybug species do not pose a health threat to humans; however, the multi-colored Asian lady beetle is known to aggravate asthma and cause allergic reactions in some people.

Reference: pestword.org

 

Bed Bugs Dos & Don’ts

Pest Control, Bed Bug

Pest Control, Bed Bug

When it comes to bed bugs, there are many myths and theories out there, but here are some helpful tips of what to do and more importantly what not to do in the case of bed bugs..

 

Do:
• Get a bed bug inspection as soon as you suspect a problem!

• Save any bugs you find. Several bugs are commonly mistaken for bed bugs including young cockroaches, ticks and carpet beetles.

• Contact your landlord or property manager if you live in an apartment building and advise them of the problem.

• Use caution when buying or acquiring used furniture, TVs, electronics, clothing, boxes, etc. These items may be infested with bed bugs. If you must take them, inspect items for signs of infestation carefully. Wash or heat treat clothing, bedding, etc. before storing them with your personal belongings.

• Eliminate clutter, especially in the bedrooms. Piles of laundry, newspapers, magazines, junk, etc. Seal discarded items in plastic bags before removing them from the infested area and dispose of them immediately in the outdoor trash.

• Tightly seal any items that you are moving out of the infested area in plastic garbage bags. Before you take anything out of the infested area (to the trash or to be laundered or otherwise treated), make sure it is tightly sealed in plastic to avoid dropping bed bugs and eggs and spreading the infestation.

• Wash, dry and store clothing, bedding, linens and other items and keep them out of the infested area until all treatments are completed.

Don’t:
• Don’t throw away your bed, furniture clothes and other personal belongings unless instructed to by your pest control professional. These items can often be treated, saving you a great deal of money.

• Don’t move because of bed bugs. If your home is infested, so are your belongings, you will just carry the problem to a new location.

• Don’t pick up beds, furniture or other items put out for trash collection. These items may have been discarded because of a bed bug infestation.

• Don’t attempt to treat bed bugs on your own. The National Pest Management Agency (NPMA) states, “This is not a pest that can be controlled with do-it-yourself measures.” The NPMA also declared the bed bug the most difficult indoor pest to control, even for professional pest managers.

• Don’t use outdoor pesticides indoors to try to treat bedbugs. These pesticides can cause serious health problems and even death when not used in accordance with their labels.

• Do not use rubbing alcohol, lawn and garden chemicals and other flammable materials to treat bed bugs. These products are being implicated in house fires around the country.

• Do not use foggers or bug bombs to treat bed bugs. They don’t work and they chase bed bugs into other areas of the structure, making treatment more difficult and expensive.

 

Most importantly, if you’re having an issue with bed bugs, call us for a free estimate today!